WorldFish accomplishes its research through more than 160 donor-funded projects that are part of the CGIAR Research Programs.

This project explores the future of aquaculture development in Indonesia and identifies pathways for growth.

Although about 43% of the African continent is considered arid and water-poor, it supports the livelihoods of nearly 485 million people. This part of the continent is largely ignored as having potential for aquaculture development, but it has underground water sources (including brackish water aquifers), dams, seasonal ponds and pools from abandoned open-cast mines that all could be used for aquaculture.

Fish is the most important animal-source food in Bangladesh. Approximately 60 percent of the population eats fish at least every other day, with per capita daily consumption at 44 grams for the poorest households.  Fish is rich in micronutrients like vitamin A, iron, and zinc. Vitamin A is essential for childhood survival, zinc reduces stunting in children and iron is essential for brain development in children. Bangladesh has high incidence of micronutrient deficiency.

Aquaculture for Low Income Consumers (AquaLINC) is a project that aims to increase supplies of affordable and nutritious fish for poor consumers. It will explore innovative production methods to produce smaller tilapias, and test fish feeding approaches to improve the nutritional quality of fish for consumption. Trials will be done on farms and research stations to evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of producing smaller and more nutritious fish.

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Although about 43% of the African continent is considered arid and water-poor, it supports the livelihoods of nearly 485 million people. This part of the continent is largely ignored as having potential for aquaculture development, but it has underground water sources (including brackish water aquifers), dams, seasonal ponds and pools from abandoned open-cast mines that all could be used for aquaculture.

Fish is the most important animal-source food in Bangladesh. Approximately 60 percent of the population eats fish at least every other day, with per capita daily consumption at 44 grams for the poorest households.  Fish is rich in micronutrients like vitamin A, iron, and zinc. Vitamin A is essential for childhood survival, zinc reduces stunting in children and iron is essential for brain development in children. Bangladesh has high incidence of micronutrient deficiency.

Aquaculture for Low Income Consumers (AquaLINC) is a project that aims to increase supplies of affordable and nutritious fish for poor consumers. It will explore innovative production methods to produce smaller tilapias, and test fish feeding approaches to improve the nutritional quality of fish for consumption. Trials will be done on farms and research stations to evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of producing smaller and more nutritious fish.

Pages