WorldFish accomplishes its research through more than 160 donor-funded projects that are part of the CGIAR Research Programs.

This project explores the future of aquaculture development in Indonesia and identifies pathways for growth.

Aquaculture Futures in Indonesia is a project that explores the future of aquaculture development in Indonesia and identifies pathways for growth. It examines which public and private investment strategies are best aligned with an environmentally sustainable aquaculture sector. The project will create scenarios for future seafood supply and demand in Indonesia that will empower decision-makers, land managers, and communities to assess how increased productivity can be sustainably enhanced, enabling them to develop public policies and investments that mitigate ecosystem impacts.

Freshwater capture fisheries in the Lower Mekong Basin provide a majority of the animal-source protein in local diets, and support a large proportion of community livelihoods in the region. However, the contribution of fish to supporting community welfare and livelihoods has never been fully quantified. In the absence of a solid estimate of the total economic, nutritional and livelihood value of these fisheries, their importance has often been overlooked in development planning.

In developing countries, small-scale fisheries (SSF) are a vital source of food, nutrition and income. But pressures from within and external to SSFsuch as overharvesting, infrastructure development and inadequate policy recognitionthreaten their sustainability and equitable distribution of benefits.

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Aquaculture Futures in Indonesia is a project that explores the future of aquaculture development in Indonesia and identifies pathways for growth. It examines which public and private investment strategies are best aligned with an environmentally sustainable aquaculture sector. The project will create scenarios for future seafood supply and demand in Indonesia that will empower decision-makers, land managers, and communities to assess how increased productivity can be sustainably enhanced, enabling them to develop public policies and investments that mitigate ecosystem impacts.

Freshwater capture fisheries in the Lower Mekong Basin provide a majority of the animal-source protein in local diets, and support a large proportion of community livelihoods in the region. However, the contribution of fish to supporting community welfare and livelihoods has never been fully quantified. In the absence of a solid estimate of the total economic, nutritional and livelihood value of these fisheries, their importance has often been overlooked in development planning.

In developing countries, small-scale fisheries (SSF) are a vital source of food, nutrition and income. But pressures from within and external to SSFsuch as overharvesting, infrastructure development and inadequate policy recognitionthreaten their sustainability and equitable distribution of benefits.

Pages