WorldFish accomplishes its research through more than 160 donor-funded projects that are part of the CGIAR Research Programs.

The project aims to help small-scale shrimp and prawn farmers work collaboratively and scale up their participation in export market value chains, while also focusing on food safety, animal health, and the associated environmental and social issues.
This project explores the future of aquaculture development in Indonesia and identifies pathways for growth.

In the Solomon Islands, overfishing and climate change have depleted natural resources and increased pressures on subsistence-level livelihoods. The Developing Inland Aquaculture project is a four-year partnership between WorldFish and the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) which seeks to expand currently underdeveloped inland aquaculture (fish farming) to supplement dwindling marine resources in Solomon Islands.

Rice and fish are key elements of the diet and major agricultural production sectors in Myanmar. Rice-fish systems (RFSs) encompass a spectrum of farming and fishing practices, from traditional capture of fish in rice-dominated landscapes through to controlled farming of fish in rice fields. Rice farming covers approximately 8 million ha and involves more than 5 million rural households. Myanmar governments of the recent past favored “command and control” based policies that discouraged rice farmers from diversification and making production decisions based on market demand.

More than half of the land base in many regions, including Southeast Asia, is constrained by poor soil quality, and 12 million additional hectares of land are degraded annually, where 20 million tons of grain could have been grown instead. The project promotes the use sustainable land management (SLM) practices that help close yield gaps and enhance the resilience of land resources and communities that depend on them while avoiding further degradation.

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In the Solomon Islands, overfishing and climate change have depleted natural resources and increased pressures on subsistence-level livelihoods. The Developing Inland Aquaculture project is a four-year partnership between WorldFish and the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) which seeks to expand currently underdeveloped inland aquaculture (fish farming) to supplement dwindling marine resources in Solomon Islands.

Rice and fish are key elements of the diet and major agricultural production sectors in Myanmar. Rice-fish systems (RFSs) encompass a spectrum of farming and fishing practices, from traditional capture of fish in rice-dominated landscapes through to controlled farming of fish in rice fields. Rice farming covers approximately 8 million ha and involves more than 5 million rural households. Myanmar governments of the recent past favored “command and control” based policies that discouraged rice farmers from diversification and making production decisions based on market demand.

More than half of the land base in many regions, including Southeast Asia, is constrained by poor soil quality, and 12 million additional hectares of land are degraded annually, where 20 million tons of grain could have been grown instead. The project promotes the use sustainable land management (SLM) practices that help close yield gaps and enhance the resilience of land resources and communities that depend on them while avoiding further degradation.

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