WorldFish accomplishes its research through more than 160 donor-funded projects that are part of the CGIAR Research Programs.

This project explores the future of aquaculture development in Indonesia and identifies pathways for growth.

Extreme poverty and food insecurity are stark facts in the lives of many people living in rural Timor–Leste, where undernutrition affects 45% of children under the age of five. Fish is rich in micronutrients and is an important part of a balanced diet.

In the Solomon Islands, overfishing and climate change have depleted natural resources and increased pressures on subsistence-level livelihoods. The Developing Inland Aquaculture project is a four-year partnership between WorldFish and the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) which seeks to expand currently underdeveloped inland aquaculture (fish farming) to supplement dwindling marine resources in Solomon Islands.

Rice and fish are key elements of the diet and major agricultural production sectors in Myanmar. Rice-fish systems (RFSs) encompass a spectrum of farming and fishing practices, from traditional capture of fish in rice-dominated landscapes through to controlled farming of fish in rice fields. Rice farming covers approximately 8 million ha and involves more than 5 million rural households. Myanmar governments of the recent past favored “command and control” based policies that discouraged rice farmers from diversification and making production decisions based on market demand.

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Extreme poverty and food insecurity are stark facts in the lives of many people living in rural Timor–Leste, where undernutrition affects 45% of children under the age of five. Fish is rich in micronutrients and is an important part of a balanced diet.

In the Solomon Islands, overfishing and climate change have depleted natural resources and increased pressures on subsistence-level livelihoods. The Developing Inland Aquaculture project is a four-year partnership between WorldFish and the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) which seeks to expand currently underdeveloped inland aquaculture (fish farming) to supplement dwindling marine resources in Solomon Islands.

Rice and fish are key elements of the diet and major agricultural production sectors in Myanmar. Rice-fish systems (RFSs) encompass a spectrum of farming and fishing practices, from traditional capture of fish in rice-dominated landscapes through to controlled farming of fish in rice fields. Rice farming covers approximately 8 million ha and involves more than 5 million rural households. Myanmar governments of the recent past favored “command and control” based policies that discouraged rice farmers from diversification and making production decisions based on market demand.

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