WorldFish accomplishes its research through more than 160 donor-funded projects that are part of the CGIAR Research Programs.

This project explores the future of aquaculture development in Indonesia and identifies pathways for growth.

Sustainably reducing poverty and improving food and nutrition security are challenges that require coordinated efforts and partnerships between organizations. The partnership between the Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA) and WorldFish supports the sustainable management of natural resources in communities across Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam.

Since the 1980s, aquaculture production in Egypt has grown rapidly, adding substantially to the supply of affordable fish to domestic markets. As a result, aquaculture markets have become a strategic food sector that contributes to nutrition security and sustains substantial employment opportunities for informal retailers, many of whom are women. However, the informal nature of fish retailing can result in different forms of insecurity relating to insufficient lending arrangements, risk of postharvest losses and poor returns, and threat of harassment or arrest.

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Sustainably reducing poverty and improving food and nutrition security are challenges that require coordinated efforts and partnerships between organizations. The partnership between the Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA) and WorldFish supports the sustainable management of natural resources in communities across Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam.

Since the 1980s, aquaculture production in Egypt has grown rapidly, adding substantially to the supply of affordable fish to domestic markets. As a result, aquaculture markets have become a strategic food sector that contributes to nutrition security and sustains substantial employment opportunities for informal retailers, many of whom are women. However, the informal nature of fish retailing can result in different forms of insecurity relating to insufficient lending arrangements, risk of postharvest losses and poor returns, and threat of harassment or arrest.

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