WorldFish accomplishes its research through more than 160 donor-funded projects that are part of the CGIAR Research Programs.

This project explores the future of aquaculture development in Indonesia and identifies pathways for growth.

Since the 1980s, aquaculture production in Egypt has grown rapidly, adding substantially to the supply of affordable fish to domestic markets. As a result, aquaculture markets have become a strategic food sector that contributes to nutrition security and sustains substantial employment opportunities for informal retailers, many of whom are women. However, the informal nature of fish retailing can result in different forms of insecurity relating to insufficient lending arrangements, risk of postharvest losses and poor returns, and threat of harassment or arrest.

WorldFish, USAID and the Government of Bangladesh (GoB) have come together to support the country’s coastal fishing communities and improve food security through research-led fisheries management initiatives. The project seeks to strengthen the ability of local communities, especially women, to extract maximum benefit from coastal environments using sustainable best practices and to mitigate the adverse affects of climate change. It will work closely with small-scale artisanal catch fisheries that target hilsa shad, the national fish of Bangladesh.

Poverty, vulnerability and inequality persist in many sectors of Pacific Island society. Women, men and youth often have limited opportunities to improve wellbeing outside of natural resource exploitation and, in many cases, current livelihoods do not offer a pathway out of poverty and food insecurity. This project implements a participatory livelihoods enhancement approach with community groups in Solomon Islands and Timor-Leste, where visions and enhancement pathways are co-developed into action plans. These plans are then implemented and refined through cycles of action and reflection.

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Since the 1980s, aquaculture production in Egypt has grown rapidly, adding substantially to the supply of affordable fish to domestic markets. As a result, aquaculture markets have become a strategic food sector that contributes to nutrition security and sustains substantial employment opportunities for informal retailers, many of whom are women. However, the informal nature of fish retailing can result in different forms of insecurity relating to insufficient lending arrangements, risk of postharvest losses and poor returns, and threat of harassment or arrest.

WorldFish, USAID and the Government of Bangladesh (GoB) have come together to support the country’s coastal fishing communities and improve food security through research-led fisheries management initiatives. The project seeks to strengthen the ability of local communities, especially women, to extract maximum benefit from coastal environments using sustainable best practices and to mitigate the adverse affects of climate change. It will work closely with small-scale artisanal catch fisheries that target hilsa shad, the national fish of Bangladesh.

Poverty, vulnerability and inequality persist in many sectors of Pacific Island society. Women, men and youth often have limited opportunities to improve wellbeing outside of natural resource exploitation and, in many cases, current livelihoods do not offer a pathway out of poverty and food insecurity. This project implements a participatory livelihoods enhancement approach with community groups in Solomon Islands and Timor-Leste, where visions and enhancement pathways are co-developed into action plans. These plans are then implemented and refined through cycles of action and reflection.

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