Audited Financial Statements

This report includes the WorldFish financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2016 and December 31, 2015.

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Financing
We are committed to efficiently and transparently managing our financials. We measure our success based on our development impact.

Current Annual Report

This annual report includes highlights of progress on key research innovations that lay the groundwork for success in implementing the new strategy. We highlight the critical role of diverse public, private and civil society partnerships, and how these enable not only widespread adoption of new practices but also changes A key win for the organization in 2016 was the development and approval of the new CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH) in policies and institutions necessary to deliver impacts at scale.

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Today, fish is recognized as a global superfood, providing nutrients and micronutrients that are essential to cognitive and physical development, especially in children, and is an important part of a healthy diet. Globally, 3 billion people rely on fish for almost 20% of their animal protein. And demand for fish is increasing. Projections suggest that we will have a 68–78 million metric ton shortfall of fish by 2030. This will be especially acute in sub-Saharan Africa, where aquaculture has yet to fully develop and where fish consumption is projected to decline.

Improving the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture is vital to reducing hunger and poverty for millions of people in the developing world. Today, fish provides more than one billion poor people with most of their daily animal-source protein and, globally, more than 250 million people depend directly on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods; millions more are employed in fisheries and aquaculture value chains.

This Annual Report provides just a few examples of the pathways through which WorldFish's work delivers benefits to poor people who rely on fish for food. You will find stories about: 1) Egyptian farmers who are now benefiting from faster growing fish strains; 2) Women in Bangladesh whose incomes have grown because of the increases in production that pond management training has provided; and 3) Improvements in access to fishing grounds and local employment that investment in strengthening aquatic resource governance in Zambia have delivered.