Viability and resilience of small-scale fisheries through cooperative arrangements

The small-scale fisheries sector in many Pacific islands is facing increasing challenges in relation to resource availability, economic opportunity, and demographic and social pressure. In particular, intensifying cash-oriented livelihood strategies can exacerbate existing vulnerabilities and threaten food security and resource conservation.

Improving household tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) aquaculture through participatory action research

Land based aquaculture has the potential to mitigate future shortfalls of food fish supply in Solomon Islands. However, aquaculture is relatively new in the Pacific and such potential is hampered by a lack of aquaculture knowledge and practice within local cultures. A participatory action research approach was used to conduct on-farm trials with farmers in Solomon Islands to develop relevant and improved ways of farming and maximising productivity of the resident exotic tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus.

Potential for transformation

In April 2016, at the Pyin Oo Lwin workshop, Myanmar’s leading institutions, researchers and practitioners in fisheries and aquaculture came together with international experts to support the new government in finding the path that would best fulfill the potential of the fisheries and aquaculture sectors.

Measuring gender-transformative change: A review of literature and promising practices

Gender-transformative approaches aim to move beyond individual self-improvement among women and toward transforming the power dynamics and structures that serve to reinforce gendered inequalities. As defined by the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS), a gender-transformative approach to development goes beyond the "symptoms" of gender inequality to address "the social norms, attitudes, behaviors, and social systems that underlie them".

Aquaculture technologies and best management practices training program

The aquaculture technologies and best management practices training is a 2-week course designed for any professional working in aquaculture Africa or other parts around of world. The course covers the basics of farming aquatic animals in fresh and marine waters. It provides updated and integrated scientific and technological knowledge on the various disciplines needed for successful and responsible hatchery and farm management. The course will take place from 9 to 20 October 2016.

Suitability of different fish species for cultivation in integrated floating cage aquageoponics system (IFCAS) in Bangladesh

In rural areas of Bangladesh, the vast majority of households own only small or large shaded homestead ponds located next to their dwellings and the pond dikes are covered with large timber trees, a situation where it is quite difficult to produce fish and vegetables on the dikes. Incorporation of appropriate technologies however, can successfully utilize homestead ponds for commercial fish farming that can meet growing protein and nutritional demand.

Recognising land rights for conservation? tenure reforms in the Northern Sierra Madre, The Philippines

The legalisation of the customary land rights of rural communities is currently actively promoted as a strategy for conserving biodiversity. There is, however, little empirical information on the conservation outcomes of these tenure reforms. In this paper, we describe four conservation projects that specifically aimed to formalise land rights in the Philippines, a country widely seen as a model for the devolution of control over natural resources to rural communities.

Effects of white spot disease and bio-security on shrimp farming in Bangladesh

Shrimp culture is of central importance in Bangladesh, shrimp being the cash component of many smallholder, polyculture fish farming systems. Shrimp also contributes substantial income through exports. However, production remains low compared with other countries for a number of reasons, including low availability of good quality post larvae (PL) seed stock, lack of credit facilities, and disease problems.

Myanmar fisheries: Aquaculture (Burmese version)

Fish is an extremely important component of the Myanmar diet, and demand is growing quickly as the country urbanizes and incomes rise. Aquaculture is ideally placed to meet this demand, while also raising farm incomes and creating employment. This brief identifies three sets of policy options that could help to unlock the full potential of aquaculture’s contributions to rural growth and national food supply.

Myanmar fisheries: Offshore fisheries

Myanmar’s offshore fish stocks have been depleted by up to 80% since 1979, exposing Myanmar’s people to significant economic, food security, nutrition and environmental risks. This ecosystem decline has been driven by out-dated and weak laws and policies and by inadequate management and institutional capacity. Investment in protecting and restoring fish stocks, ecosystems and habitats is required.

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