Strengthening the role of women in community-based marine resource management: lessons learned from community workshops

Community-based resource management (CBRM) forms an important component of the Solomon Islands Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) inshore fisheries strategy. The strategy recognises that community-based initiatives will be the engine of sustainable economic development in the inshore marine resource sector. Key activities in the strategy include developing and refining community-based management plans and testing livelihood diversification/supplementation strategies.

Exploring Indonesian aquaculture futures

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food production sector globally, with production projected to double within the next 15–20 years. Future growth of aquaculture is essential to providing sustainable supplies of fish in national, regional and global fish food systems; creating jobs; and maintaining fish at affordable levels for resource-poor consumers. To ensure that the anticipated growth of aquaculture remains both economically and ecologically sustainable, we need to better understand the likely patterns of growth, as well as the opportunities and challenges, that these trends present.

Sustainability as a dialogue of values: Challenges to the sociology of development

Even in an increasingly polarized climate of global policy-making, the ideal of “sustainable development” retains currency across a remarkably broad swath of the political spectrum in debating alternative scenarios for the future. By adapting Weber's classic categories of value spheres and collective rationality, I distinguish contemporary approaches to operationalizing the concept of sustainability and elucidate the practical implications of each.

Report on progress 1

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (CRP AAS) began operations in July 2011 with an initial focus on establishing the key governance, management and science leadership capacities required for successful delivery. As this has progressed we have also started implementing a first suite of focal country activities, along with work to produce key science outputs to support country roll-out. This first report on progress summarizes the main highlights of our work so far.

A characterization of community fish refuge typologies in rice field fisheries ecosystems

In rural Cambodia, fish is a source of food and income to millions of people. However, there has been a real threat to fish populations in natural wetlands due to the degradation of aquatic biodiversity and habitat, illegal fishing, increase of population and demand for fish, and the use of harmful pesticides for agriculture. The Rice Field Fisheries Enhancement Project (RFFEP) seeks to rebuild and protect the fish populations through innovative methods.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 6. Landscape function analysis

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Contagious exploitation of marine resources

Rising global demand for seafood presents challenges for managing marine resources, many of which are declining or threatened. The authors describe a new and rapid pattern of contagious marine resource exploitation, which spreads via global sourcing networks to satisfy rising demand. They use sea cucumbers to illustrate the concept, given their wide geographic distribution but specific market for consumption in China.

Gender integration in aquaculture research and technology adoption processes: Lessons learned in Bangladesh

This working paper is part of a review of aquaculture technologies and gender in Bangladesh in the period 1990 to 2014. It assesses how gender has been integrated within past aquaculture technology interventions, before exploring the gender dimensions associated with current approaches to transferring knowledge about homestead aquaculture technology. It draws out existing knowledge, identifies research gaps, and selects practices to build upon--as well as practices to move away from.

Inclusion of small indigenous fish improves nutritional quality during the first 1000 days

Key contributing factors to undernutrition in low-income countries, including Bangladesh, are low dietary diversity in the diets of women and low nutrient density of traditional complementary foods (CFs) for infants and young children. Several plant-based processed CFs have been developed in Bangladesh, however, all have required fortification with vitamins and minerals to achieve desired nutrient densities. There are few examples in the literature of a combined approach using animal source foods (with the exception of milk) in processed food products targeted at the first 1000 days.


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