Social dimensions of local fisheries co-management in the Coral Triangle

The challenge to manage coastal resources within Asia-Pacific's Coral Triangle has gained global attention. Co-management is promoted as a key strategy to address this challenge. Contemporary community-based co-management often leads to ‘hybridization’ between local (customary) practices, and science-based management and conservation. However, the form of this hybrid has rarely been critically analysed. This paper presents examples of co-management practices in eastern Indonesia and Solomon Islands, focusing in particular on area closures.

Lessons for resource conservation from two contrasting small-scale fisheries

Small-scale fisheries present challenges to management due to fishers’ dependency on resources and the adaptability of management systems. The authors compared social-ecological processes in the sea cucumber fisheries of Zanzibar and Mayotte, Western Indian Ocean, to better understand the reasons for resource conservation or collapse.

The contribution of nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) to food security and livelihoods in Solomon Islands

Fish aggregating devices, or FADs, are used widely in developing countries to concentrate pelagic fish, making them easier to catch. Nearshore FADs anchored close to the coast allow access for rural communities, but despite their popularity among policy makers, there is a dearth of empirical analysis of their contributions to the supply of fish and to fisheries management. In this paper the authors demonstrate that nearshore FADs increased the supply of fish to four communities in Solomon Islands.

Carp-SIS polyculture: A new intervention to improve women’s livelihoods, income and nutrition in Terai, Nepal

Based on lessons learned from field trials, carp-small indigenous fish species (SIS)-prawn polyculture technology was improved to a "carp-SIS polyculture" technology suitable for small scale farmers in Terai, Nepal. In December 2008, the project was initiated to improve income and nutrition of Tharu women in Chitwan (100 farmers) and Kailali (26 farmers) districts. The present paper presents the final results of the project.

Improving diets with wild and cultivated biodiversity from across the landscape

This paper examines the literature on how biodiversity contributes to improved and diversified diets in developing countries. We assess the current state of evidence on how wild and cultivated biodiversity in all forms is related to healthy diets and nutrition, and examine how economic factors, knowledge and social norms interact with availability of biodiversity to influence both production and consumption choices.

Are trunk lateral line anomalies and disoriented scale patterns in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) influenced by genetics?

Different kinds of defects are observed on farmed fish, and while a lot of research has concentrated on skeletal abnormalities, little is known on scale anomalies. In this paper, a survey for lateral line shape anomalies and disoriented scale patterns was carried out in a common garden experiment involving crosses of 5 different wild populations of European seabass, in order to find if any correlation exists between lateral line shape anomalies, disoriented scale patterns and genetic origin.

Orange sweet potato farming technology (Bangla)

Orange sweet potato roots and leaves are rich in vitamins and energy. They are valuable source of micronutrients particularly vitamins A, B and C. Combining orange sweet potato with other foods such as nutrient-rich small fish increases dietary diversity and improves the nutritional value of family meals. This leaflet outlines the methods used in growing orange sweet potato in Bangladesh, where 56% of the population do not meet their vitamin A requirements through their diet.

Year 1 operational report: Improving employment and income through development of Egypt’s aquaculture sector (IEIDEAS) project

Implementation of the SDC funded project ‘Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egypt’s Aquaculture Sector’ commenced on 1st December 2011 and will continue until late 2014. This report summarizes the results of the first 10 months until 30th September 2012. The project was based on a value chain analysis carried out by WorldFish in September 2011. The information in the VCA acts as the baseline for the main project parameters.

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