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Fish for the future: Fisheries development and food security for Kiribati in an era of global climate change

The Republic of Kiribati is a vast South Pacific island group with one of the largest exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in the world. Kiribati waters support a wealth of marine fisheries activities.

Exploratory analysis of resource demand and the environmental footprint of future aquaculture development using Life Cycle Assessment

Increases in fish demand in the coming decades are projected to be largely met by growth of aquaculture. However, increased aquaculture production is linked to higher demand for natural resources and energy as well as emissions to the environment.

Improving productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture

Fish—including finfish and shellfish—are an important item in the human food basket, contributing 17 percent of the global animal-based protein supply in 2010. They are an especially valuable food source in developing countries, where more than 75 percent of the world’s fish consumption occurs.

Production and conservation of nutrient-rich small fish (SIS) in ponds and wetlands for nutrition security and livelihoods in South Asia

Small indigenous fish species (SIS) are an important source of essential macro- and micronutrients which can play an important role in the elimination of malnutrition and micronutrient defciencies in the populations of many South and Southeast Asian countries.

Lessons from implementing, adapting and sustaining community-based adaptive marine resource management

Community-based marine resource management is recognized by the Government of Solomon Islands as the principle strategy for use in marine conservation and small-scale fisheries management. This strategy is particularly important in Solomon Islands due to the constitutionally recognized customary tenure systems that are in place in rural areas where the majority of the population resides. Many government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), including WorldFish, provide support to rural communities in their efforts to improve the management of their marine resources. During the last eight years in which WorldFish has worked alongside communities to support the implementation of community-based resource management (CBRM), various lessons have emerged or been reinforced. These lessons represent important considerations for CBRM, and for engaging with and supporting communities.

CGIAR Research Program on climate change, agriculture and food security

Climate change is an unprecedented threat to the food security of hundreds of millions of people. Climate change affects agriculture and food security, and likewise, agriculture and natural resource management affect the climate system.

CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish

In the developing world, more than 1 billion people depend on fish for most of their animal protein, and another 1 billion people  depend on livestock. Poor people, especially women and children, typically eat very little meat, milk and fish.

CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic and Agricultural Systems

Nearly 500 million people in the developing world depend on aquatic agricultural systems for their livelihoods, with 140 million of  these people living in poverty.

CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health

Hunger, malnutrition and poor health are widespread and stubborn development challenges. In the past, agriculture has played a  key role in providing poor people with a steady supply of staple crops that meet calorie requirements at relatively low prices.

WorldFish incubator: Investing in sustainable aquaculture through SMEs

WorldFish Incubator bridges the gap between  scientific research and business by supporting  investment in sustainable small- and medium-sized  aquaculture enterprises in Africa, Asia and the Pacific.  By building opportunities for growth, WorldFish  Incubator connects small-scale aquaculture  enterprises in Africa, Asia and the Pacific with  investors seeking scalable, high-impact, bottom-line  investments in aquaculture.

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