Sustainability as a dialogue of values: Challenges to the sociology of development

Even in an increasingly polarized climate of global policy-making, the ideal of “sustainable development” retains currency across a remarkably broad swath of the political spectrum in debating alternative scenarios for the future. By adapting Weber's classic categories of value spheres and collective rationality, I distinguish contemporary approaches to operationalizing the concept of sustainability and elucidate the practical implications of each.

A summary of "An overview on reservoir fisheries in tropical Asia" by S.-Y. Yap and J.I. Furtado

This overview on tropical Asian reservoir fisheries was prompted by issues raised in "Tropical reservoir fisheries: a preliminary analysis." Considerably different but building upon the above preliminary study, the present review emphasizes the theoretical concepts of trophic relations in harvesting and managing multispecies fisheries, integrated within a whole ecosystem perspective.

The Structure and margins of the Lake Chilwa fisheries in Malawi: a value chain analysis

Small freshwater pelagic fisheries in closed lakes are very important to millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa providing livelihoods and nutritional security. However, returns from these fisheries have been shown to uctuate in response to climatic variability. In order to understand the impact of these fluctuations on the livelihoods of people dependant on these fisheries, there is a need for information on how the fish value chain is organized and how it functions in response to variation in supplies.

Strengthening governance across scales in aquatic agricultural systems

Aquatic agricultural systems in developing countries face increasing competition from multiple stakeholders operating from local to national and regional scales over rights to access and use natural resources—land, water, wetlands, and fisheries—essential to rural livelihoods. A key implication is the need to strengthen governance to enable equitable decision-making amidst such competition, building capacities for resilience and transformations that reduce poverty.

Strategies for the sustainability of online open-access biodiversity databases

Scientists should ensure that high quality research information is readily available on the Internet so society is not dependant on less authoritative sources. Many scientific projects and initiatives publish information on species and biodiversity on the World Wide Web without users needing to pay for it. However, these resources often stagnate when project funding expired. Based on a large pool of experiences worldwide, this article discusses what measures will help such data resources develop beyond the project lifetime.

Stock assessment of Indian Ocean yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) based on data from a sport fishery

An assessment is made of the Indian Ocean yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares ) stock, using data from a sport fishery in the Pemba Channel off the Kenya-Tanzania border in conjunction with commercial catch figures for theIndian Ocean. The long-term maximum sustainable yield is estimated to be around 113,000 tons/annum; dataindicate that catch levels of yellowfin tuna in the Indian Ocean exceed the MSY by a dangerous amount.

Stimulating investment in pearl farming in Solomon Islands: Final report

The overall objective of the project is the reduction of poverty in rural areas of Solomon Islands through creation of livelihoods based on sustainable aquaculture. This fits within the over-arching goals of the WorldFish Center in the Pacific to reduce poverty and hunger in rural communities, and with the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) to stimulate rural development and to develop aquaculture.

Status of demersal fishery resources in the Gulf of Thailand

Data from trawl surveys (1961 - 95) and annual production statistics (1971 - 95) were used to examine the status of demersal fishery resources in the Gulf of Thailand. Analyses were focused on biomass trends, population parameters and exploitation rates of dominant species, and assessment of excess capacity from fishing effort and yield estimates. The results indicate by 1995, the trawlable biomass in the Gulf had declined to only about 8.2% of the biomass level in 1961.

Pages

Subscribe to WorldFish RSS