What influences the form that community-based fisheries management takes in Vanuatu

Vanuatu has a long history of efforts to manage coastal fisheries, from customary practices to various forms of contemporary community-based fisheries management (CBFM) promoted by non-governmental organisations and government projects. In this article we summarise how the experiences and lessons over the last 25 years have shaped the CBFM model Vanuatu now uses.

Who says women can’t fish? Stories of successful women farmers in Bangladesh and Nepal

This booklet present several stories of women in rural Bangladesh and Nepal who are making positive changes in their communities. The stories have been collected from a variety of projects WorldFish has been implementing over the past nine years with support from partners and donors. These inspirational women have undertaken new agriculture-aquaculture livelihood opportunities to better their lives and those of their family members. To get where they are now, these women have had to overcome many challenges.

Understanding adaptive capacity and capacity to innovate in social-ecological systems: Applying a gender lens

Development policy increasingly focuses on building capacities to respond to change (adaptation), and to drive change (innovation). Few studies, however, focus specifically on the social and gender differentiation of capacities to adapt and innovate. We address this gap using a qualitative study in three communities in Solomon Islands; a developing country, where rural livelihoods and well-being are tightly tied to agriculture and fisheries. We find the five dimensions of capacity to adapt and to innovate (i.e.

Impacts of community-based fish culture in seasonal floodplains on income, food security and employment in Bangladesh

This paper examines the impact of community based fish culture in seasonal floodplains on fish production, consumption, income, and food security of the participating households in Bangladesh. An analysis was performed using a randomly selected 46 % of the households from the three project and control floodplains; data were collected using longitudinal surveys on a seasonally, quarterly and monthly basis for the years 2007, 2008 and 2009.

Genetic evaluation of growth and survival at 6 weeks old fry of Egyptian Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) between improved Abbassa and commercial Manzala strains in a diallel crossing

The main objectives of this study were to evaluate growth performance and estimate line crossing parameters of improved Abbassa tilapia strain and a commerciall Manzala strain within a complete diallel cross at 6 weeks old after hathing. This is done in order to determine the optimum utilization of these strains and crosses for the production of premiun growth and survival of tilapia seeds.

Gender inequalities in access to and benefits derived from the natural fishery in the Barotse Floodplain, Zambia, Southern Africa

People living in and around the Barotse Floodplain are some of the poorest in Zambia due to many factors restricting their abilities to engage in activities to secure food and income. Women, and in particular resident women, are especially constrained given certain gender norms and power relations that hamper them from accessing and adequately benefiting from the natural fishery. Resident women typically rely on other, less remunerative means to secure their livelihoods.

The Role of gender in the development and adoption of small-scale aquaculture: Case study from northeast Cambodia

In Stung Treng Province north-east Cambodia, WorldFish in partnership with the Fisheries Administration (FiA) and the non-government organisation, Culture and Environment Preservation Association (CEPA), used community science to improve the uptake of small-scale aquaculture (SSA) by communities with limited space and experience of fish culture. The project was funded by the Wetlands Alliance Program and the SSA system, called “WISHPonds” that combines the words “Water and Fish” to reflect the integration of water and fish cultivation with water for storage and vegetable growing.

Non-farmed fish contribute to greater micronutrient intakes than farmed fish: results from an intra-household survey in rural Bangladesh

Fish is the most important animal-source food (ASF) in Bangladesh, produced from capture fisheries (non-farmed) and aquaculture (farmed) sub-sectors. Large differences in micronutrient content of fish species from these sub-sectors exist. The aims of the present paper are to describe the importance of fish in the diets of vulnerable groups in comparison to other ASF, and the contribution of species from non-farmed and farmed sources to nutrient intakes.

Sustainable intensification in smallholder agriculture: An integrated systems research approach

Sustainable intensification has recently been developed and adopted as a key concept and driver for research and policy in sustainable agriculture. It includes ecological, economic and social dimensions, where food and nutrition security, gender and equity are crucial components. This book describes different aspects of systems research in agriculture in its broadest sense, where the focus is moved from farming systems to livelihoods systems.

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