Increasing productivity and improving livelihoods in aquatic agricultural systems: a review of interventions

The doubling of global food demand by 2050 is driving resurgence in interventions for agricultural intensification. Globally, 700 million people are dependent on floodplain or coastal systems. Increased productivity in these aquatic agricultural systems is important for meeting current and future food demand. Agricultural intensification in aquatic agricultural systems has contributed to increased agricultural production, yet these increases have not necessarily resulted in broader development outcomes for those most in need.

A typology of fisheries management tools: using experience to catalyse greater success

Fisheries provide nutrition and livelihoods for coastal populations, but many fisheries are fully or over-exploited and we lack an approach for analysing which factors affect management tool performance. We conducted a literature review of 390 studies to assess how fisheries characteristics affected management tool performance across both small-scale and large-scale fisheries. We defined success as increased or maintained abundance or biomass, reductions in fishing mortality or improvements in population status.

Predicting vulnerability to management changes in data-limited, small-scale fisheries

It is estimated that more than 200 million people worldwide depend on small-scale fisheries for their livelihood, driving the need for fisheries reform to develop effective, local-level governance systems to protect food security and lessen reliance on common resources. However, our ability to impose new management relies on the assessment of vulnerability and adaptive capacity, and the lack of social-ecological data often stifles decision making.

Portable ponds for communities in need

To address the extreme food insecurity of the poor households in Bangladesh, WorldFish has designed a portable small pond which can hold fish in it and at the same time, provide water for horticulture. Trials began in 2014 when these 'WISH' (water and fish) ponds were distributed amongst selected rural 'pond-less' communities and semi-urban landless communities, and tested for integrated aquaculture and horticulture.

Getting beneath the surface in program planning, monitoring and evaluation: Learning from use of participatory action research and theory of change in the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems

Many rural poor and marginalized people strive to make a living in social-ecological systems that are characterized by multiple and often inequitable interactions across agents, scale and space. Uncertainty and inequality in such systems require research and development interventions to be adaptive, support learning and to engage with underlying drivers of poverty. Such complexity-aware approaches to planning, monitoring and evaluating development interventions are gaining strength, yet, there is still little empirical evidence of what it takes to implement them in practice.

Effective supervision of inland capture fisheries of Bangladesh and its hurdles in managing the resources

Community-based approaches have gained significant attention in inland open water fisheries management in Bangladesh. This article focuses on the challenges and opportunities of the inland open water fishery resources under community-based management approaches. The present study employed management information of waterbodies between 1991 and 2014 across a range of geographical locations and habitats. The study reveals that coordinated management of water bodies is essential given common management issues of waterbodies.

Conflicts over natural resource scarcity in the aquatic ecosystem of the Lake Chilwa

This paper examines the linkage between resource scarcity and conflict during the 2012 Lake Chilwa water level recession. Ecosystem degradation and resource scarcity negatively affect many poor people dependent on aquatic systems such as river floodplains and wetlands. The need to identify and implement innovative measures to manage the scarce resources in these systems has sometimes resulted in conflicts among the various resource users such as fishers, farmers and political groups.

What influences the form that community-based fisheries management takes in Vanuatu

Vanuatu has a long history of efforts to manage coastal fisheries, from customary practices to various forms of contemporary community-based fisheries management (CBFM) promoted by non-governmental organisations and government projects. In this article we summarise how the experiences and lessons over the last 25 years have shaped the CBFM model Vanuatu now uses.

Who says women can’t fish? Stories of successful women farmers in Bangladesh and Nepal

This booklet present several stories of women in rural Bangladesh and Nepal who are making positive changes in their communities. The stories have been collected from a variety of projects WorldFish has been implementing over the past nine years with support from partners and donors. These inspirational women have undertaken new agriculture-aquaculture livelihood opportunities to better their lives and those of their family members. To get where they are now, these women have had to overcome many challenges.

Pages

Subscribe to WorldFish RSS