Opinion: The SSF Guidelines were the first sector-specific international guidelines to involve a participatory process, whereby stakeholders interacted as part of a voyage of struggle, empathy and support.

The effects of climate change are felt differently by men and women. As a result, women need different strategies from men to enable them to adapt, according to recently published WorldFish research from Malawi’s Lake Chilwa Basin.

In Solomon Islands, where coastal resource decline and environmental degradation are increasingly putting livelihoods and food security at risk, the 'lite-touch approach' has been suggested as a more efficient and cost-effective way to establish and spread community-based resource management.

Aquaculture in Zambia is a significant industry, contributing around 30,000 metric tonnes, or 27 percent, of the country’s total fisheries production. Despite this, more efforts to farm fish are needed, as the lack of production is a major cause of Zambia’s low fish consumption, says Dr. Mary Lundeba, a WorldFish scientist and field researcher.

A modified Secchi disk to measure water transparency in fishponds and determine the amount of plankton is helping smallholders in Sierra Leone to farm fish as part of profit-oriented agribusinesses.

After a month of intensive, hands-on practical learning, 16 students from
across southern Africa completed the first Aquaculture Vocational
Mentorship Course, held at the Lake Harvest company in Zimbabwe.

Over the past three decades, the global aquaculture industry has risen from obscurity to become a critical source of food for millions of people, mostly through export. This boom has led scholars to question whether aquaculture contributes to the food security of poorer people in producing countries.

Market-led aquaculture is changing the lives of small-scale farmers in Nigeria and Kenya, highlighting the huge potential for aquaculture to drive rural development across Africa. That’s the message of a recently released report by the UK’s All-Party Parliamentary Group on Agriculture and Food for Development.

Marine litter is a problem caused globally, but it is being most felt by coastal communities in developing countries, like Adara in Timor-Leste. Finding sustainable solutions to marine litter is the focus of World Oceans Day today, of which research to build the recognition and resilience of small-scale fisheries and fishers plays a critical part.

A new understanding between WorldFish and FAO will combat hunger and improve livelihoods by promoting the impact of fisheries and aquaculture research.

Pages

Subscribe to WorldFish in the News