Research in development: the approach of AAS

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is pursuing a Research in Development approach that emphasizes the importance of embedding research in the development context. Reflecting this emphasis the six elements of this approach are a commitment to people and place, participatory action research, gender transformative research, learning and networking, partnerships, and capacity building. It is through the careful pursuit of these six elements that we believe that the program will achieve the development outcomes we aspire to, and do so at scale.

Red tides: of the dinoflagellate Pyrodinium cause paralytic shellfish poisoning on both sides of the tropical Pacific

Over 40 Researchers from the six ASEAN countries, and from Australia, Canada, Japan, Papua New Guinea, Central America and the USA, participated in a Management and Training Workshop on Pyrodinium Red Tides, held 23-30 May 1989 in Brunei Darussalam, to discuss the biological, economic, management, medical and training issues of Pyrodinium red tides.

The realities of fishery management in the Southeast Asia region

Fishery management, particularly in Southeast Asia, is concerned primarily with people problems rather than resource problems. It cannot be successful unless viewed in the context of rural development. Conventional constraints to management include lack of theory, lack of data, lack of trained personnel, lack of institutional infrastructure, lack of physical infrastructure and gear conflicts.

Protein and micronutrient composition of low value fish products commonly marketed in the Lake Victoria region

Increase in demand of fish from Lake Victoria region has created gaps in local fish supplies and this raises concern since there are reports of limited animal-source food consumption plus protein and micronutrients deficiencies in this region. To fill the gap, less-preferred pelagic fish species such as Mukene (Rastreneobola argentea) and by-products from filleting Nile perch (Lates niloticus), which were commonly used for animal feeds, are increasingly being minimally processed and marketed for direct human consumption.

Principles for best practice for community-based resource management (CBRM) in Solomon Islands

This document is one outcome from a workshop held in Gizo in October 2010 attended by 82 representatives from government, NGO’s private sector, and communities. The target audience for the document is primarily organizations planning to work with coastal communities of Solomon Islands to implement Community-Based Resource Management (CBRM). It is however also envisaged that the document will serve as a reference for communities to better understand what to expect from their partners and also for donors, to be informed about agreed approaches amongst Solomon Islands stakeholders.

A preliminary analysis on the socioeconomic situation of coastal fishing communities in Vietnam

Fish production in Vietnam increased rapidly from 420 000 t in 1981 to 1 130 680 t in 1998. Likewise, there was an expansion in the number of motorized fishing boats from 29 584 units with an average horsepower (HP) of 19.8 boat-1 in 1981 to 71 800 units with an average HP of 26.2 in 1998. In 1995, fish production was valued at VN$2 475 billion (US$0.02 billion at 1 US$ = 11 041 VN$; source: oanda. com).

The potential of nutrient-rich small fish species in aquaculture to improve human nutrition and health

Small fish are a common food and an integral part of the everyday carbohydraterich diets of many population groups in poor countries. These populations also suffer from undernutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies – the hidden hunger. Small fish species, as well as the little oil, vegetables and spices with which they are cooked enhance diet diversity. Small fish are a rich source of animal protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals.

Post-harvest handling of low-value fish products and threats to nutritional quality: a review of practices in the Lake Victoria region

Under the Regional Programme Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa, implemented by the WorldFish Center in collaboration with FAO, this paper is the second in a series of papers that have been generated from reviewing literature on trends in consumption and processing of low-value fish products marketed in the Lake Victoria region. The papers fall under the programme’s research component in Uganda, analyzing nutritive quality and post-harvest activities in ‘low value’ fish market chains around Lake Victoria, focusing on Mukono District, Uganda.

Population dynamics of Etelis carbunculus (Lutjanidae in Tonga, South Pacific)

This paper presents a tentative estimate of the parameters L8 and K of the von Bertalanffy growth function, and an estimate of total mortality derived from the analysis, using the ELEFAN I and II programs, of length-frequency data on the snapper Etelis carbunculus (Lutjanidae) collected on seamounts of the Kingdom of Tonga, South Pacific.

Pond polyculture technologies combat micronutrient deficiencies and increase household income in Bangladesh

Two sustainable, low-cost pond polyculture technologies have been developed to culture carps and mola in ponds, and culture carps and mola in ponds connected to rice fields. These technologies can increase total fish production from ponds. Farmers depend on carps as an income source, and mola is rich in micronutrients that can help to meet the nutritional requirements of the rural poor, particularly women and young children.

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