Strengthening the resilience of small-scale fisheries: A modeling approach to explore the use of in-shore pelagic resources in Melanesia

Small-scale fisheries play a critical role in both poverty alleviation and food security. A large proportion of the world fish stocks are, however, getting fully or over-exploited. In this article we address these issues in the context of the small-scale fisheries of the Solomon Islands. The paper explores the extent to which in-shore Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) can help increasing the resilience of the small scale fishery system and reconciling social, economic and ecological priorities.

Homestead pond polyculture can improve access to nutritious small fish

In Bangladesh, homestead pond aquaculture currently comprises a polyculture of large fish species but provides an ideal environment to integrate a range of small fish species. Small fish consumed whole, with bones, head and eyes, are rich in micronutrients and are an integral part of diets, particularly for the poor. Results from three large projects demonstrate that the small fish, mola (Amblypharyngodon mola) contributes significantly to the micronutrients produced from all fish, in homestead ponds, in one production cycle.

WorldFish in Bangladesh

Since 1989, WorldFish has been working with the Bangladesh Government and development partners to create a more productive fisheries and aquaculture sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security.

WorldFish in Myanmar

WorldFish is working with the Myanmar Government and other partners to create a policy environment to improve fisheries management and capture more economic, social and environmental benefits for the long term. The WorldFish integrated research and development program is endorsed by the government and seeks to unlock the potential for growth in aquaculture, for example in the many household ponds in the Ayeyarwady Delta, Central Dry Zone, Shan State and Sagaing Region. Scaling-up smallholder aquaculture can bring benefits such as better incomes, nutrition and health.

Vitamin B-12 status in infancy is positively associated with development and cognitive functioning 5 y later in Nepalese children

Poor vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) status is widespread in South Asia. Insufficient vitamin B-12 status has been linked to poor neurodevelopment in young children. The objective of this paper is to measure the associations between vitamin B-12 status in infancy (2–12 mo) and the development and cognitive functioning in Nepalese children 5 y later.

Including GHG emissions from mangrove forests LULUC in LCA: a case study on shrimp farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

Mangrove forests have been recognized as important regulators of greenhouse gases (GHGs), yet the resulting land use and land-use change (LULUC) emissions have rarely been accounted for in life cycle assessment (LCA) studies. The present study therefore presents up-to-date estimates for GHG emissions from mangrove LULUC and applies them to a case study of shrimp farming in Vietnam.

Improving feed efficiency in fish using selective breeding: A review

Improving feed efficiency (FE) is key to reducing production costs in aquaculture and to achieving sustainability for the aquaculture industry. Feed costs account for 30-70% of total production costs in aquaculture; much work has been done on nutritional and husbandry approaches to improve FE but only a limited amount of research has been devoted to using genetics, despite its potential. This paper reviews past work to improve FE in fish using selective breeding and assess future directions.

Ecoviability for ecosystem-based fisheries management

Reconciling food security, economic development and biodiversity conservation is a key challenge, especially in the face of the demographic transition characterizing many countries in the world. Fisheries and marine ecosystems constitute a difficult application of this bio-economic challenge. Many experts and scientists advocate an ecosystem approach to manage marine socio-ecosystems for their sustainability and resilience. However, the ways by which to operationalize ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) remain poorly specified.

Chinese trader perceptions on sourcing and consumption of endangered seafood

Growing trade networks through globalization have expanded governance of local environments to encompass multiple scales. The governing role of market actors, such as traders and consumers in importing countries, has been recognized and embraced for sustainable seafood sourcing and trade. The perceptions that affect the conduct of these actors are a potential influence on governance of distal environments. In this paper we investigate the perceptions of sea cucumber traders in China.

Policies in harmony? Does the New Song agree with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines?

With the recent endorsement of two supra-national policies — the New Song and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines -- Pacific Island countries and territories are being called on to lead the process of national implementation and monitoring to improve socioeconomic and environmental conditions in coastal fisheries and fishing communities. To aid this effort, we compare these policies on three levels -- visions, guiding principles and recommendations -- to determine if a harmonised approach to implementing these two policies is possible.

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